Reflections on Harnessing the Power of Resilience

Reflections on Harnessing the Power of Resilience

Challenges and changes. Tests of fortitude, capacity and endurance. We all faced them in 2020 and they’ve followed us into 2021. It’s why when Mike Seyfer, Hailey Sault’s CEO and my business partner, suggested that our Believe in Better Project 2021 event be centered around resilience, I was all in.

What is Believe in Better?

For those of you who’ve never been, The Believe in Better Project is a two-day event created in the spirit of a Nantucket Project or Aspen Ideas Festival. Each year, visionary speakers are invited to give the speech of their lives focused on fixing what’s broken in health care. Each gives a 20- to 30-minute TED-style talk followed by a question and answer session. Needless to say, we’ve had a lot to discuss since The Believe in Better Project began in 2018. 

Believe in Better 2021: Harnessing the Power of Resilience

This year, of course, the event was held virtually. And, what an event it was! Our speakers and panelists embraced the topic of resilience and took us on a cathartic journey that had us: 

  • Taking pride in the obstacles we’ve overcome.
  • Reflecting on our leadership through multiple crises.
  • Confronting bias in our data-gathering and messaging.
  • Embracing a model of health care built on compassion and determined to change the system as we know it.
  • Holding ourselves and our marketing departments together through a pandemic, vaccination hesitation and more.
  • Looking inward to our strengths and reserves.
  • Moving deeper into our creativity.

7 Takeaways

Here are just a few snippets of the personal and professional resilience-building wisdom that was shared with us:

#1. Be like Luke. (thank you Eric Zimmer)

We all want a life that goes smoothly, but just like Luke Skywalker in Star Wars, each of us has our own personal Darth Vaders—those tough things that enter our lives. It’s by facing our Vaders that we become open to new possibilities and opportunities; we gain personal strength; we have deeper, more powerful relationships; and we have a greater appreciation for life. 

Screen shot from webinar - Eric Zimmer

When we’re faced with an event that is difficult to get past, we have to ask ourselves:

  • What story am I telling myself about this (what am I making it mean)?
  • Who do I want to be during this?
  • Who can help me?

#2. Mother Nature is angry. We need to prepare. (thank you Jarrod Bernstein)

We live in an era where Mother Nature is angry: hurricanes, volcanoes, tornadoes, drought and a pandemic are just a few of the ways she is expressing herself. Add to her anger the political and social upheaval we’re experiencing and resilience becomes everybody’s business.

We must build a culture of resilience so that we are able to move on the fly with the right skill set. Building that culture means:

  • Making resilience part of everything you do.
  • Talking about the hazard—making it real, acknowledging it.
  • Preparing.
  • Leading and modeling resilience, as well as mental health. (Your personality, your soul and your mind need a tuneup from time to time.)
  • Being able to laugh at the absurdity of it all.
  • Testing our response.

#3. What’s wrong with data? (thank you Chris Hemphill)

We believe that data is perfect and true, when it is anything but. Why? Because the algorithms used to collect that data are biased. All algorithms are guilty of bias until proven innocent.

Screen Shot from BIB webinar - Chris Hemphill

Addressing bias in our data collection is no small task and includes looking at it with knowledge, through technology, and through our culture and philosophy. Only then can we ensure that what our data is informing is inclusive. 

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#4. Caring for the sickest of the sick. (thank you Gray Miller)

Titanium Healthcare cares for the sickest of the sick—people with three to five chronic conditions. The model its founder, Gray Miller, created provides a higher level of care to the patient through care coordination, taking time to uncover what is causing people to stay sick.

Screen shot of BIB webinar - Gray Miller

Many of Titanium’s patients are dealing with so many health and life issues that it’s difficult to get them to a state that equals something close to autonomous. However, with care, a spark can be lit and the resilience that is within them can lead to better health.

#5. We’ve learned to bend like the willow. (thank you panelists Katie Johnson, Lisa McCluskey, Cynthia Floyd Manley)

Managing and leading a marketing and communications department through the COVID crisis and on, through vaccination shortages and now vaccine hesitancy, has been a marathon that hasn’t ended. Pivoting and problem-solving in a new way has been a must. Our views on resilience have changed. We’ve come to expect challenges and we choose how to respond to them in a healthy way.

Positives that have come from the crisis:

  • Meeting with colleagues on Zoom and seeing their kids and pets has humanized them. People have become kinder and gentler and are taking care of each other.
  • Health care has had to innovate quickly and break down long-standing barriers.
  • Better collaboration among teams.
  • Physicians are engaged with marketing.
  • Increased reliance and confidence in the marketing department.
  • Connecting with the community.
  • Strong focus on employee wellness.

#6. Why all of a sudden am I burned out? (thank you Chaz Wesley)

Caregivers right now are in what is called compassion fatigue. They feel guilty and may make up a story around why they shouldn’t be feeling the way they do:

  • I am called.
  • I get paid to do this.
  • I signed up for this.

They become depressed, anxious, and detached. There is a need to find balance and discover resilience. How they cope, how they find resilience, is as individual as each person. There is no magic formula. Everyone needs permission to pause and rest.

“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” —Victor Frankl, Austrian neurologist, psychiatrist, philosopher, author and Holocaust survivor. 

#7. I dare you to take this serious business and make it more human! (thank you Chrisie Scott)

Creativity is the fingerprint of the human spirit and a must-have for our times. It has a place in our most serious and personal industry—health care.

Screen shot of BIB webinar - Chrisie Scott

We need to “heartwire” our thinking and the words we use in health care—make them more human, approachable and emotive. The non-creative language we use in health care can be hurtful and even lead to poor outcomes. Everything speaks; we need to pay attention.

You can take it all in: Watch for information 

As always when The Believe in Better Project is over, I am amazed at and energized by the many brilliant people fighting for better. The many who in small and big ways care for and about those who are underserved and forgotten by the system. I am in awe of those who are working diligently to fix what is broken and I am filled with hope for where health care is headed. If you’d like to take in Believe in Better 2021, links to speaker videos and our panel discussion will be available soon. You can sign up to receive them here. I hope you’ll take me up on the offer. You’ll be amazed and energized too.

Download the 2021 Trends Report

COVID-19: The 5 Connection Points Health Care Must Nurture

COVID-19: The 5 Connection Points Health Care Must Nurture

One year ago (give or take a few weeks), our focus as health care communicators and leaders shifted from brand-driven communication to purpose-driven communication—and making connections with our audiences in order to provide vital health information. 

On this anniversary of the COVID-19 crisis (and our first Campfire session), we discuss five connection points driving patient satisfaction, staff morale and community relations. 

  1. Human-to-human connections
  2. Patient connections
  3. Staff connections
  4. Community connections
  5. Community partner connections

Download Trends Report

Campfire Panelist:

Kevin is highly regarded and recognized for his work as a speaker, strategist, trainer and facilitator. In addition to his position at Memorial Medical Center, he is President of Stranberg & Associates and Senior Consultant with The Baird Group.

Campfire Moderators: 

  • Stephen Moegling, SVP of Growth, Hailey Sault 
  • Marsha Hystead, Partner, CCO, Hailey Sault

Connection: COVID-19’s Call to Action 

Chapters in this Campfire

00:00 Introduction—introducing Kevin and a topic overview

03:21 Connecting Human-to-Human—the basis of our work as health care communicators and leaders

08:26 Connecting with Patients—concrete strategies for realizing patient satisfaction scores that include reaching the 94th percentile for rate and the 95th percentile for recommend 

18:49 Connecting with Staff—ramping up connection and communication with staff, watching for burnout into the next year

26:15 Connecting with Community—monitoring what the community is saying, strategies for connecting online

33:55 Connecting with Community Partners—coming together for the greater good and continuing those connections

40:53 S’Mores Break—predictions: what will the office “next normal” look and feel like

Join Us for Our Next Campfire Session

Hailey Sault is a health care marketing agency that creates human connection for brands. For more patients and appointments. More engagement and advocacy. More memorability and market share.

We host these Campfire Sessions to discuss the issues and opportunities facing health care marketers. These are webinars without boring slides, bullet points, and sales pitches—just great insights shared by and for our marketing colleagues. We hope you’ll join us around the virtual Campfire.

[PAST CAMPFIRES]

Download the 2021 Trends Report

The Health Care Marketer’s Post-Pandemic World

The Health Care Marketer’s Post-Pandemic World

Who remembers Stretch Armstrong? He was the muscular, gel-filled action figure toy who could stretch from his original size of 15 inches to 4 or 5 feet and then bounce back again. That’s how one of our three guest panelists, Kelly Meigs from Tanner Health in Georgia, described how her health care marketing team has been operating since last March. The metaphor quite possibly describes how most of us feel about now. 

So, take a minute to relax back to your original shape and watch this Campfire all about what’s next for health care marketers. Hear how guests from three distinct markets—Illinois, Nevada and Georgia—are stretching their way into 2021. 

Explore health care marketing topics that include:

  • Engaging patient-consumers—what strategies are working?
  • Revenue recovery—how to get patients back in for care.
  • Planning vs. doing—how to manage daily to-dos and long-range planning.
  • Community vigilance as COVID numbers drop—encouraging medical workers to get vaccinated.
  • Being the trusted health news source.

Download Trends Report

Campfire Panelists:

  • Kelly Meigs, Vice President of Marketing Strategy & Planning, Tanner Hospital System, Georgia
  • Laura Shea, Director of Marketing & Community Relations, Humboldt General Hospital, Nevada
  • Carl Maronich, Marketing Director, Riverside Healthcare, Illinois

Campfire Moderators: 

  • Stephen Moegling, SVP of Growth, Hailey Sault 
  • Mike Seyfer, Partner, CEO, Hailey Sault

What’s Next: Chapters in this Campfire

00:00 Introduction—guest and topic background.

09:17 Engaging patient-consumers—what strategies are working?

19:01 Revenue recovery—how to get patients back in for care.

27:51 Planning vs. doing—how to manage daily to-dos and long-range planning.

41:07 Community vigilance as COVID numbers drop—encouraging medical workers to get vaccinated.

44:24 S’Mores Break—being the trusted health news source.

Join Us for Our Next Campfire Session

Hailey Sault is a health care marketing agency that creates human connection for brands. For more patients and appointments. More engagement and advocacy. More memorability and market share.

We host these Campfire Sessions to discuss the issues and opportunities facing health care marketers. These are webinars without boring slides, bullet points, and sales pitches—just great insights shared by and for our marketing colleagues. We hope you’ll join us around the virtual Campfire.

[PAST CAMPFIRES]

Download the 2021 Trends Report

Engagement is the New Branding: 2021 Health Care Marketing Trends Report

Engagement is the New Branding: 2021 Health Care Marketing Trends Report

As we face another year of planning inside a global pandemic there is one (and only one) trend that we believe needs to be front and center for health care marketers—patient-consumer engagement. 

Join us as we back up the bold statement that engagement is the new branding. 

Learn how to apply these four go-to patient engagement strategies and tactics throughout 2021: 

1. Leverage “digital dialogue”—creating two-way conversations with your audiences, which leads to brand trust and service utilization

2. Own the “trusted health news source” positioning—patient-consumers are seeking health information with health care brands like never before

3. Create “personalized messaging”—the pandemic revealed the different wants, needs and perspectives of health audiences—so personalize your content to be hyper-relevant and hyper-engaging

4. Restore the morale of burned out front-line workers and distrustful patient-consumers through “mission mindset”—leverage your organization’s mission to uplift and engage key audiences

 

Download Trends Report

Hailey Sault Campfire Panelists:

  • Marsha Hystead, Partner and CCO
  • Joe Gunderson, Director of Visual Identity
  • Denise Burgess, Senior Writer

Moderator: Stephen Moegling, SVP of Growth

Health Care Marketing Trends: Chapters in this Campfire

00:00 Introductions—getting ahead of the curve in 2021.

04:46 2021 Global Trend: Engagement is the New Branding—consumers will reward health care organizations that engage them by keeping up with the demand for content.

06:17 High Expectations for Engagement—core health care audiences have grown up with engagement.

08:59 Hot-Button Engagement Topics—patient-consumers want to hear about topics that don’t fall into classic branding categories.

10:12 Brand Loyalty Battleground—disengagement is the first step to provider switching; 31% of patients are considering switching.

11:24 2021 Sub-Trend: Engaging through Personalized Messaging—there is no single narrative that will connect with every patient audience.

12:00 Personalized Messaging in Action—using patient journey mapping and personas.

17:01 Audience QuickPoll—what services are the hardest when it comes to re-engaging your patients’ return to care?

18:26 2021 Sub-Trend: Engaging through Enhanced Digital Dialogue—consumers want health care systems to engage in conversations that can lead to shared understanding and positive actions.

19:33 Digital Dialogue in Action—polls, town halls, webinars, Zoom meetings, digital video, Instagram, programmatic video. 

24:51 2021 Sub-Trend: Engaging through your Mission—engage skeptical consumers and build resilience for burned out health care workers by leaning into your mission.

26:17 Mission Mindset in Action—reintroduce health care heroes to your community as the one-year anniversary of their fight against COVID-19 arrives.

30:35 Audience QuickPoll—Are you more or less optimistic about your future than you were in the fall of 2020?

32:17 2021 Sub-Trend: Engaging as a Trusted Health News Source—the opportunity for your brand to position itself as your community’s health media organization.

33:15 Patient-Consumer Insights—90% of health care decision makers indicate that they want regular information from their provider right now.

34:10 Trusted News Source in Action—tactics for using consumers’ #1 trusted source of information—your providers.

42:37 Recap

44:21 S’Mores Break—One thing each panelist believes you should take away from this webinar.

Join Us for Our Next Campfire Session

Hailey Sault is a health care marketing agency that creates human connection for brands. For more patients and appointments. More engagement and advocacy. More memorability and market share.

We host these Campfire Sessions to discuss the issues and opportunities facing health care marketers. These are webinars without boring slides, bullet points, and sales pitches—just great insights shared by and for our marketing colleagues. We hope you’ll join us around the virtual Campfire.

[PAST CAMPFIRES]

Download the 2021 Trends Report

2021 Health Care Marketing Predictions

2021 Health Care Marketing Predictions

One of Hailey Sault’s core values is to be fearless. That’s why in a year that is starting out to be anything but predictable, we’re kicking off this whole first month of 2021 with health care marketing predictions and trends. This Campfire Session lays the groundwork for what lies ahead for health care marketing—and what to do to get ahead of the curve. At the end of the month, we’ll share our Engage 2021 Trends Report in a special Campfire Session and make it available for you to download. Our report takes a deeper dive into one global trend we predict will guide health care through 2021 and includes four strategies and tactics you can put to use.

Watch our Campfire Session, 2021 Health Care Marketing Predictions. Or read below for key takeaways from our webinar event!

On 01/15/2021, Stephen was joined by two seasoned health care marketing pros.

  • Theresa Jacobellis, President & CEO, PrescRXptive Communications. Host, Healthcare Confidential podcast.
  • Chris Boyer, Principal & Senior Digital Strategist @chrisboyer LLC. Founder and Show Host, touch point media. 

2021 health care marketing predictions were made surrounding:

  • Health care consumerism
  • The health infodemic 
  • Crisis planning

Health Care Consumerism: an old trend with some new twists

Consumerism has been a trend that is not new to health care; however, there are factors that are going to accelerate this trend in 2021.

Theresa’s health care consumerism predictions 

  • The word concierge is something health care will need to become familiar with because society is becoming more and more demanding of personalized services and no field is more personal than health care.
  • Patients want communications and services from health care that are targeted to their needs—that show providers are aware of who they are as individuals.
  • Patients will be willing to reach into their pocket a little bit if that is necessary and pay a little more to receive personalized services.
  • The number one thing providers should be doing is focusing on customer service.

Chris’s health care consumerism predictions

  • Consumerism in health care can be seen in Amazon getting into the health care space, as well as Walmart Health coming in with its retail location. 
  • CVS, Walgreens and Walmart will be significant players in health care when vaccination opens up to the public.
  • There are “shoppable services” in health care, especially with price transparency becoming effective on January 1.
  • Services that are very much in the consumer mindset include testing, urgent care services, imaging services and other lower acuity services.
  • Transparency and shoppable services are a trend that will evolve in the coming years.
  • Telemedicine will remain with us. The pandemic has shifted our opinions as consumers to doing things online. 
  • Not only are we consumers, but we are now digital consumers. Digital consumerism will be the future.
  •  Patient experience will become the imperative in this consumeristic space

The more we can understand what our patients want and where the friction points are in their experience, the better we can be at making our relationship with them more meaningful.

Stephen’s health care consumerism predictions

  • “One-size-fits-all” messaging will decline in favor of personalized marketing strategies. The pandemic revealed the disparate mindsets, feelings and needs of health care consumers.
  • As a result, health care brands will “up” their personalized marketing game—with the goal of increasing patient-consumer engagement.
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The Health Infodemic: our second pandemic

We are seeing misinformation spread much more quickly on social media than good information.

Theresa’s health infodemic predictions

  • This is a battle that marketers need to dive into because as communicators it is incumbent upon us to create and provide vetted, credible information that helps consumers make good decisions about their health.
  • Social media is the “Wild, Wild West” and this is becoming a bigger problem. Marketers need to think about how our marketing messages can also be vehicles for good information.

Chris’s health infodemic predictions

  • In the interest of serving their patients and communities in a better way, hospitals and health systems are square in the middle of the battle against misinformation. Especially when it comes to information about COVID, wearing masks, safety and vaccines. 
  • Providers are the most trusted source of health information for patients right now, above all other sources, including the traditional news media.
  • There has to be movement from everyone including us in a grassroots way as health care marketers, as well as government and big tech, to address the infodemic problem.
  • This is our opportunity to step up to fill the messaging void. We have to be proactive with our messages and be the first voice out there with credible information.

Stephen’s health infodemic predictions

  • In a time of high consumer skepticism, health systems will leverage the ability to be seen as the local, trusted source of health information. 
  • Health systems will create more opportunities for patient-consumers to learn more and engage in “hot button” issues like COVID, the vaccines and safety protocols. Given the confusion created by the “health infodemic,” health systems will invest in tools like video and live chats to offer two-way dialogues with patient-consumers to help disseminate and address the concerns, fears and skepticism. 

Crisis Planning: it’s been an all-year, all-the-time ordeal

We are in constant crisis planning mode because of the shifting nature of the pandemic and it has sapped the energy out of all of us.

Chris’s crisis planning predictions

  • We thought in 2020 we would pivot into vaccine communication, but now we’re seeing vaccine communication as a health care crisis planning effort as well because of misinformation and the complexity surrounding the problem.
  • We have to become more strategic with our crisis communication planning. We need to build in systems and processes for it so we can be more nimble and information can cascade to those who need it. One idea may be to build a page on our website to house all new information as it happens and direct our patients to that resource page.

Theresa’s crisis planning predictions

  • This pandemic has given us opportunities to communicate in new ways. We are seeing health systems do more reaching out to their constituencies and stakeholder groups through webinars and emails.
  • This has shown us that crisis communication planning is not just episodic and it’s not just for large health systems and hospitals, it’s for everybody.

Stephen’s crisis planning predictions

  • Because health care has been in “crisis” mode for virtually a year, health systems will implement agile strategic planning models that account for crisis communications while addressing the need for long-term planning and vision.  
  • Health systems will recognize that crisis communications have a significant part to play in addressing the long-term strategic goals for the organization. For example: how we engage patient-consumers in crisis communications now has long-term strategic implications, such as whether or not patient-consumers believe their providers are trusted sources of health information and care delivery. 

KEY TAKEAWAYS from our 2021 health care marketing predictions webinar

1. Health care consumerism is going to accelerate as a trend, especially as price transparency evolves.

2. Consumerism is making patient experience paramount.

3. Social media is the “Wild, Wild West” and it is incumbent upon us to create and provide vetted, credible information that helps consumers make good decisions about their health.

4. Providers are the most trusted source of health information for patients right now. This is our opportunity to step up to fill the messaging void.

5. The pandemic has shown us that crisis planning is not just episodic. We must become more strategic with our crisis planning. 

Contact Theresa or Chris:

Theresa Jacobellis, President & CEO, PrescRXptive Communications. Host, Healthcare Confidential podcast.

https://www.prescrxptivecommunications.com/

https://heliumradio.com/shows/healthcare-confidential/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/theresajacobellis/

Chris Boyer, Principal & Senior Digital Strategist @chrisboyer LLC. Founder and Show Host, touch point media. 

http://www.christopherboyer.com/

https://touchpoint.health/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/chrisboyer/

Join Us for Our Next Campfire Session

Hailey Sault is a health care marketing agency that creates human connection for brands. For more patients and appointments. More engagement and advocacy. More memorability and market share.

We host these Campfire Sessions to discuss the issues and opportunities facing health care marketers. These are webinars without boring slides, bullet points, and sales pitches—just great insights shared by and for our marketing colleagues. We hope you’ll join us around the virtual Campfire.

[PAST CAMPFIRES]

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What Your Patients Want Right Now

What Your Patients Want Right Now

This just in from Hailey Sault’s latest national research study, released December 10, on what consumers are thinking about and wanting from health systems and providers: The number of patients actively contemplating new providers is staggering. 

The good news: there are things marketers can do to help people right now, while also helping their organizations’ bottom lines in the long run. Feeling too overwhelmed as it is? We understand. But you also need to understand your audience. If you’re as interested in the question, “What do patients want right now?” as we are, you’ll want to check out our latest Campfire. 

Hailey Sault hosts, Mike Seyfer and Stephen Moegling, share the latest results of our consumer research and offer actionable insights for you to get rolling. 

Watch our 45-minute Campfire Session, “What Your Patients Want: Patient Engagement Trends,” that was broadcast live on 12.10.20, for the full effect. An abbreviated recap follows.

Here’s a brief synopsis of what Stephen and Mike cover in the Campfire. 

Topics 

  • Why patient engagement should be a top priority
  • What your patients want to hear from you now
  • When vaccination content is going to be valuable
  • How to measuring engagement in meaningful ways

During the show, our hosts introduce ideas that may be counterintuitive to what some health care marketers are thinking right now. With that mind, Mike took the role of being in the Hot Seat, with Stephen acting as The Skeptic.  

Background

It’s a crazy time to simply provide care. Why should we be paying extra attention to what people think about health care right now? Well, this pandemic crisis will eventually subside. But unless we apply insights on how consumers want health brands to engage with them right now, we risk creating a new crisis for our organizations: patients switching to new providers. 

That point was driven home during a recent Campfire Session with Chris Hemphill of SymphonyRM, who helped us crunch some numbers and explore strategies surrounding patient loyalty and engagement. From there, we set about doing a survey of 700 people in the United States to discover what people were thinking about engaging with, and being engaged by, their health provider. 

Download the research report featured at the Campfire: no opt-in required. We want our colleagues to have the data and insights needed to make informed marketing decisions.

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Key takeaways 

Here’s a taste of the findings we shared at the Campfire. 

1. Why make engagement a priority? 

Consumers are still scared, concerned and, it turns out, increasingly disengaged from their providers. Less than 50% of consumers believe their providers have engaged with them since the pandemic. When consumers feel disengaged from health brands, they begin looking for new providers. 

As a marketing and public relations focus, patient engagement has typically been considered a soft metric, handled less informally or with less rigorous goals and intent, Mike notes. But the longer you wait to have an engagement strategy, the greater the risk of churn.

That is, as COVID rages on, your risk of patient out-migration, or “churn,” during COVID increases in equal proportion to the lack of engagement they experience. Driving up patient engagement so that you can reduce churn is key to ensuring future revenue.

Depending on your market and COVID-19 case counts, your organization might not have capacity to develop new patient acquisition strategies. But 31% of consumers are thinking about switching providers. And of those consumers who feel “disengaged,” 46% are likely considering making a provider switch.

2. What do patients want to hear from you?

People want excellence, but they also want to feel compassion, and experience transparency. 

A resonant engagement strategy will strike a balance between compassionate care and COVID information. Compassionate care is a big trigger for patients choosing to switch. At the same time, they want new COVID information, especially regarding testing, from a local trusted source.

Messaging matters. In the study, the words “compassion” and “care” showed up in 20 percent of open-ended responses. Learn more. 

3. How to measure engagement more meaningfully?

What are the preferred communications channels that consumers want you to use to engage them?  The study showed that people value personalized channels, including these top three preferred methods of engaging with health care providers: 

  • Phone 
  • Email 
  • Texting 

While scoring lower as primary channels, these channels shouldn’t be ignored as consumer engagement metrics: 

  • Website metrics 
  • Digital marketing metrics 
  • Organic social media metrics

You can still measure based on your owned media channels, and continue to improve the patient experience of using them. In fact, the largest percent of study respondents said they’d respond to engagement efforts by going to a website and subscribing to get more information. 

Email offers a particularly notable “workhorse” for reaching out and engaging with patients, Mike and Stephen note at the Campfire. Beyond sharing public health information, organizations can use email to target audiences who need specific service line care, while creating connection points with your owned digital channels.

4. When is vaccination content going to be valuable? 

Right now. During the S’Mores Break at the end of the Campfire, we discussed a recent Transcend Strategy Group study, and noted how interest in vaccination information has made its way into our research for the first time. People want to know when, how and where they can get vaccinated. There will be a race in your community to provide vaccines, and those who communicate the details around it effectively may gain new patients.

Join our next Campfire

We started the Campfire webinars in the early days of COVID-19 so colleagues could discuss the issues and opportunities impacting health care marketers. That was when we thought COVID-19 would be “here today, gone tomorrow.” Clearly, there’s still a lot to discuss. Join us and your colleagues for an upcoming session soon. 

Click the link below to view past Campfires and to be notified of future Campfires.

Warm up your health care marketing

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